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LSD: Long Slow Distance (Read 9301 times)
Gerrit-Jan Linker
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LSD: Long Slow Distance
21.03.09 at 08:59:09
 
LSD: Long Slow Distance
 
Long slow distance running can be beneficial to increase running speed. By doing long slow runs the energy efficiency is increased.  
 
By doing long (2 hours or longer) slow paced (50-60%) runs the number of mitochondria increases the most.  
 
When performing intense training, the more intense the training the more benefit, even at short durations. Long duration intense training is not efficient.
 
Bottom line?
A mixture of long slow paced runs (over 2hrs, 60% max HR) and intense runs (interval work, >75% of max HR) may work best.
 
Benefit of long runs over short runs
Two hour runs at 50-60%, 90% increase in mitochondria.
30min runs at 50-60% increased mitochondria by 30%.
(Note that the research is done on rats and not on human runners)
Quote:
... one group of rats running 10 minutes per day, another running for 30 minutes, a third group exercising for 60 minutes, and a fourth working for 120 minutes per day. Training took place five days a week for 13 weeks, and training intensity was fixed at about 1.2 mph (or about 32 metres per minute and 313 minutes for the 10K, which is an intensity of around 50- to 60-per cent VO2max for a healthy lab rat).

Not too surprisingly, the two-hour per day runners turned out to have the best mitochondrial set-ups. For example, compared to sedentary rats, the 10-minute per day exercisers had about 16-per cent more cytochrome c, while the 30-minute workers boosted cytochrome c by 31 per cent. However, rats who ran for an hour expanded cytochrome c by 38 per cent, and the two-hour rats increased it by 92 per cent!

Quote:
'cytochrome c', a key compound found inside mitochondria which is crucially important in aerobic energy production

 
Not too fast!
The effect described above vanishes when running too fast? No benefit over 60min of running if intensity is 70-75%. It seems important to say at 50-60% of intensity therefore.
Quote:
...that training beyond about 60 minutes per workout was without benefit in terms of increasing cytochrome c. In other words, a rat training at about 70 to 75% VO2max could upgrade cytochrome c by expanding workout duration from 30 to 60 minutes - but not by increasing workouts from 60 to 90 minutes. This was true at all intensities studied by Dudley - and also with all three muscle fibre types. Progressing beyond about 60 minutes per workout simply didn't have much value when it came to the mitochondria.

 
In contrast: The faster the better.
If intensity is high, then just short very intense trainings are most effective.
Quote:
...in fast-twitch muscle fibres, just 10 minutes of fast running (at close to 100% VO2max) per day was enough to roughly triple cytochrome c concentrations over an eight-week period. In contrast, running for 27 minutes at 85% VO2max daily only hoisted cytochrome c by 80 per cent, while 60 to 90 minutes at 70 to 75% VO2max nudged cytochrome c upward by just 74 per cent. So much for the theory that intense exercise can hurt mitochondria.

 
Earobic resistance vs. aerobic power
The main benefit of a long slow run is to develop aerobic resistance. This contrasts with medium paced training runs, and with tempo runs which develop aerobic power.
 
Sources:
Mitochondria Functions - More mitochondria mean more PBs, but what do you have to do to get them?
http://www.pponline.co.uk/encyc/0129.htm
LONG SLOW DISTANCE: Slow, but not too slow
http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/training_for_running/102930
Long Slow Distance
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Slow_Distance
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« Last Edit: 21.03.09 at 10:43:26 by Gerrit-Jan Linker »  

Gerrit-Jan Linker
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Gerrit-Jan Linker
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Re: LSD: Long Slow Distance
Reply #1 - 22.03.09 at 17:17:36
 
Feedback from a trainer:
 
Quote:
Rules of thumb
a  variation (endurance runs and interval training)
b  do well what you need to do. If you need to do a long slow run, do it slow. Do you need to do an interval at 100% then run as fast as you can. Prevent to run in a 75-85% regime but also train well below and above this point.
c. make the training specific to your goal.
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« Last Edit: 22.03.09 at 17:18:33 by Gerrit-Jan Linker »  

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